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The 124 Building

Situated in the center of the Fire Blocks District and directly across from the Huffman Building, the 124 Building will become the commercial office foundation of the emerging neighborhood.

Completed in late 1917, the 124 Building was the last of the “fire proof” buildings to be completed in the Fire Blocks District. The 5-story classic Chicago building with buff brick façade has been home to some of Dayton’s founding commercial companies including:

  • Dayton Gas,

  • Light & Coke Co.,

  • Delco Light,

  • and C.S. Ball Candy Company.

Street and sub-street levels will become home to retail, art, culture and service businesses.

The upper floors will be opened up for creative service and technology companies with unconventional, Class A office space.

 
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Commercial

  • Class A Office Space

  • Unique and creative spaces

  • Unconventional, lofted spaces

  • Open office design

  • Close proximity to housing, food and beverage, wellness, etc.

  • Easy, accessible andample parking

  • $15-18 PSF (NNN)

  • Variable TI packages for white boxed spaces, typically ranging from $10-15 depending on length of lease term

Ground-Level Activated Spaces

  • Elevated concepts and creative spaces

  • Open office design

  • Close proximity to housing, offices, services, wellness and other amenities

  • Easy, accessible and ample parking

  • $15-18 PSF (NNN)

  • Variable TI packages for white boxed spaces, typically ranging from $10-15 depending on length of lease term

DESIGN  This property is located just east of the Elks Lofts on Third street and was constructed in 1917.  This five-story, buff brick veneer, Commercial style building has replaced storefronts divided by massive concrete classical pilasters.  A heavily molded cornice divides the first, second, fourth and fifth stories.  Upper story windows are replacement single sashes.  The first and last bays are single windows: other windows are grouped in threes and are located in brick panels divided by brick piers.  Fifth-story bays are divided by paneled piers.  A modest entablature and shaped parapet tops the building.

HISTORY  This building holds the distinction of being the last building built on East Third street.  Although Robert Dickey announced plans to rebuild on the site in April 1913, construction was delayed until 1917.  A large building designed for light industry and retail space, it was constructed in the Commercial style with emphasis on classical detailing.  Its wide variety of tenants included the Lowe Brothers Paint Store, the C.S. Ball Candy Company, the Delco Light Products store, the Buckeye Engineering Company (tool designers), the Siebert Manufacturing Company (spark plug manufacturers), Giele and Pflaum Printing Company and the Young Catholic Messenger.

The Windsor Companies